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Triadic Tales - Fifteen Minutes Before a Roaring Fire - Short Story (Part Two)

Triadic Tales - Fifteen Minutes Before a Roaring Fire - Short Story (Part Two) PART ONE

The afternoon rolled on toward evening and the coming event - dinner with her - lent an air of palpable excitement to things. Except for Adam. He had long ago determined that celebrity in itself was a fragile basis for excitation. He reserved such moments of enthusiasm for other things, many of which do not need to be named. In any case, as the cocktail hour drew nigh, Adam donned a spacious Greek natural wool sweater over his standard issue shirt and walked toward the entrance hall where everything in the rambling Vineyard home converged. 

Morton and Wife Two were standing in the hall with their eyes on the door. It was just a door actually. The house seemed to have neither a front nor a back door. It did not take a minute for headlights to pierce the gathering dark. 

She preceded the short, elderly gentleman who was her consort. As Adam was the only stranger, Morton introduced him to her, naming him but not her. 

Her first statement, after a polite handshake, was that it was terribly cold. It was. Especially for August.

Immediately, Adam asked if she wanted his sweater. Actually it wasn't his. It was Eva's. Eva gave it to him. Though in truth nothing in the life of Eva and Adam was so fixed that ownership could be easily assigned. 

She smiled, moved toward Adam and spoke softly.

"No," she said, in reference his offer. "But why don't we walk in there and sit in front of the fire and talk?" She gestured to an adjacent room where a fire was indeed blazing away.  

"Sure," said Adam.

No sooner said than done.

Adam thought she was rather like girls he used to know in New York when he went to parties there. A floppy wool sweater like his would have no place in that realm of prim cashmere cardigans. She was wearing a bluish version of such a sweater.  I am referencing Adam's color-blindness. It might have been greenish. Or even gray.

Their talk settled on her work, which was publishing.  And Adam's stomping grounds at the time - the Berkshires, at the other end of Massachusetts. Just now Adam was sitting as far from there as he could get and remain in the state.

Adam thought to himself that she might well enjoy the sort of thing he was doing at this point - driving back and forth across the country on secondary roads, filling spiral notebooks with observations and otherwise negotiating the time  following his marital dissolution.  He wondered how easy it would be for her to move about.

The ease of the whole thing was what must have produced  later reaction among the Broadley children, who inundated Adam with questions like, "Do you know her?" and "What was that all about?" 


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"Sto Perigiali" One of the Surpassingly Best Tunes Theodorakis Has Written

A Setting for a Poem "Denial" Beloved by the Greek People by the Nobel Prize Winning Poet Giorgos Seferis

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=dhk0ckaCxDI
The remarkable video at the link above is of a performance of "Sto perigiali" Mario Frangoulis and Mikis Theodorakis in 2001.

Frangoulis and Theodorakis are joined by musicians, including two bouzouki players, and a very large audience that is completely familiar with the words. The audience joins in at Frangoulis' prompt.

This is my very favorite Theodorakis melody. Those who know Theodorakis only for his "Zorba" music are in for a treat. When I was in Athens in 1966, for a short period of study with Constantinos Doxiadis, I knew nothing of Theodorakis. But about five years later, my friend Irene Vassos sang "Sto perigiali" to us. I have never gotten the tune out of my mind.

Later, when Irene joined our group to form a travelling company performing "New Rain", I learned to pick out a …

Stephen C. Rose Bio

Stephen C. Rose (1936-) was born in New York City and raised there. He currently lives there. He was educated at Trinity, Exeter, Williams and Union Theological Seminary. He served in the Student Interracial Ministry in Nashville. He founded and edited the prize-winning Renewal Magazine in Chicago and studied with C. A. Doxiadis in Athens. His first books "The Grass Roots Church" and "Who's Killing The Church" established him as a prominent critic of American Protestantism and American religion. He was and remains a civil rights activist. He has interviewed and done in depth pieces on Saul Alinsky and Martin Luther King, Jr. He won awards for editorial courage and for two documentary films. He has written and published many songs and musical works including "We Are All Americans". During the late 90s and early 2000s he worked for UN agencies, most recently editing CHOICES Magazine at UNDP. Since 2000 he has written several books for distribution via K…